Common Problems Found in Older Homes

Posted by Office Staff on Friday, November 1st, 2013 at 11:47am.

Some people contend that “newer is always better,” but more and more are straying from that mindset and looking for a home with both age and character. Just because newer homes have the advantage of simply being built more recently, doesn’t mean they’re always a better choice.

One downside of such decades-old homes is that they tend to have more maintenance issues than one built recently – same goes for most things, including cars. But, homes that were built in similar eras will suffer from similar ailments, so you can prepare yourself for what is to come. Here are the most common issues for homes built 40 or more years ago:

Pre-1978 homes – Lead paint

1978 was the year that the United States banned the use of lead paint, finally understanding the dangers of the substance, but before then it was used frequently. It doesn’t cause much harm to adults, but can be very toxic for children when ingested. Before you make the move, make sure your dream home has been checked out!

Pre-1970s homes – No circuit breakers

It’s important to remember that older homes have fuse boxes instead of circuit breakers. If this is the case for your new home, make sure to familiarize yourself with the fuse box (or multiple fuse boxes) in your home so you know what controls what – you’ll be thanking yourself during the next power outage.

Pre-1960s – Window drafts

Believe it or not, windows used to be framed out of wood before the big modern-style craze took over, but that just means that your windows are much more prone to drafts and leaks. This has the potential to cost you on your energy bill, so get your windows checked out to make sure you aren’t losing money.

Pre-1940s – Steel Pipes

These were popular in pre-war era homes, but they easily become susceptible to rust, clogging, low water pressure, and more. It’s advised that you get any steel pipes in your home replaced – it may be a headache, but it’s much better than dealing with the aftermath of a pipe burst. 

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